John Carpenter Q&A: Why ‘Halloween’ Didn’t Need Sequels & What Scares The Master Of Horror

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Jen on Genre James Cameron TerminatorJohn Carpenter keeps his office in a converted hillside Hollywood home, on a quiet tree-lined street evocative of the sleepy suburb Michael Myers terrorized in 1978’s Halloween. Inside, the walls are lined with memories marking Carpenter’s four decades in film: original prints, awards, figurines of Kurt Russell as Snake Plisskin and the Creature From The Black Lagoon movie Carpenter spent years trying to make at Universal, a sculpture commemorating the prankster goosings on the set of his Big Trouble In Little China. Carpenter, 67, chain smokes as we revisit the films that made his career — starting with Halloween, a film originally titled The Babysitter Murders that the hungry young director took after making his debut with 1974 sci-fier Dark Star and honing his chops with 1976’s Assault On Precinct 13.

Carpenter speaks candidly of his successes and failures, and of the health issues that required…

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